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Jan 19, 2020, 10:28 am

US ARMY ANNISTON ARMY DEPOT CERCLIS Site

EPA Identifier: 110000368851
CERCLIS ID: 110000368851
Location:
33.65943, -85.96943

Address:
7 FRANKFORD AVENUE
ANNISTON, AL

Create Date: 01-MAR-00
Update Date: 07-FEB-13
Final Date: 19890313


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SIC Codes: 1629, 3795, 4212, 4953, 9711
SIC Descriptions:
HEAVY CONSTRUCTION, NOT ELSEWHERE CLASSIFIED, NATIONAL SECURITY, TANKS AND TANK COMPONENTS
Programs: {AIRS/AFS,BR,CER
Program Interests:
AIR MAJOR, COMPLIANCE ACTIVITY,

NAICS Descriptions:
ELECTROPLATING, PLATING, POLISHI
Site Summary:
Federal Register Notice:  March 13, 1989

Conditions at proposal (October 15, 1984): Anniston Ordnance Depot, which occupies approximately 30 square miles in Anniston, Calhoun County, Alabama, was officially designated as an ammunition storage area on October 14, 1941. Over the years, operations were expanded to include the overhauling and repairing of combat vehicles and artillery equipment. The facility is currently referred to as the Anniston Army Depot (ANAD).

This NPL site consists of six different disposal operations covering 600 acres in and adjacent to the Southeast Industrial/Vehicle Rebuild Area. The six disposal operations were combined to form this NPL site. Five are waste disposal pits or lagoons containing liquid chemical and industrial wastes contaminated with heavy metals and chlorinated organic solvents. At the sixth location, drums containing calcium hypochlorite (bleaching powder) were buried.

According to analyses reported by the Army in 1982, metals and chlorinated solvents were present in the ground water beneath the ANAD Southeast Industrial Area. Ground water is the source of drinking water for Calhoun County residents. The hydrogeology of Calhoun County is very complex and requires further studies to define possible aquifer interconnections. The highly fractured bedrock apparently is the source rock for Coldwater Spring, which supplies private and public water. The spring may be connected via fractures to contaminated ground water at the ANAD site. The Anniston municipal water supply system provides drinking water for an estimated 39,000 people.

ANAD is participating in the Installation Restoration Program, established in 1978. Under this program, the Department of Defense seeks to identify, investigate, and clean up contamination from hazardous materials. The Army has completed Phase I (records search), Phase II (preliminary survey), and Phase III (assessment of remedial action alternatives). Two portions of the site (encompassing approximately 5 acres) have been closed under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Wastes and contaminated soils from those two areas were excavated and removed to a permitted facility.

Status (April 1987): EPA is reviewing an Army study of ground water beneath 31 RCRA and CERCLA solid waste management units at ANAD, including the Southeast Industrial Area. The Army is conducting an Endangerment Assessment that will include a summary of all previous activities.

Status (March 13, 1989): The Army installed a system to treat and recover contaminated ground water and has operated it since December 1988.